Seasoned Goat Burgers (Primal)

Goat Burger

You read correctly…  GOAT BURGERS!  Don’t pay attention to the steamed broccoli I paired with these (though it was tasty).  We just got back from vacation a couple days ago, I’ve been sick, and we haven’t gone grocery shopping yet.  I would probably do these next time wrapped in butter lettuce with some salsa or guacamole, but you can do whatever you want!

I have this fantastic ground goat from our favorite farmer that I’ve been trying to figure out what to do with.  How good is the goat?  Well, JR didn’t even know it was goat until I told him.  Good goat should be…well, it tastes like goat.  It’s a relatively mild, quite delicate flavor.  It doesn’t taste like chicken, pork, lamb, or beef.  It tastes like goat.  I’ve had goat before that was pretty gamey and honestly tasted like some sort of super gamey lamb.  But this…this is another story altogether.  A word of warning: goat fat solidifies at a pretty warm temp, so if you cook these on the stove, pour the fat off the pan immediately after pulling the burgers out.  That is, if you want to clean the pan within the week.

Seasoned Goat Burgers

Serves 4

1 pound ground goat

1 small onion, finely diced

2 cloves garlic, minced

1 medium carrot, grated

1/2 C shredded white cheese (I used a mixture of sharp cheddar and Havarti, both from the Amish village near here)

1 tsp lemon juice

2 tsp Sriracha

1 tsp ground cumin

1 tsp ground coriander

1/2 tsp paprika

salt and pepper to taste

1-2 tsp bacon fat

 

1.- Mix everything except the bacon fat in a large bowl.  Use hands to combine well, working all vegetables and spices into the meat.  Form into four or five burger patties.

2.- Melt bacon fat in a large skillet over medium-high heat (you could also do these on a grill over medium-high heat if wanted).  When hot, add burgers and cook for 3-4 minutes on each side (ground goat should reach an internal temperature of 160).

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2 thoughts on “Seasoned Goat Burgers (Primal)

  1. Linda Rae

    I have enjoyed goat the few times I have eaten it. IDK if it’s readily available here in Alaska but I do visit an East Indian restaurant from time to time that serves it.

    • chiodo80

      Yeah, it might be a little harder to find there. I’m guessing the only way you could find it would be to go the local farmer route…there *might* be someone who sells it hehe!

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